• Home
  • General
  • How to Fix the Lights of Your Camper Trailer
avatar

How to Fix the Lights of Your Camper Trailer

July 8th, 2019 in General by

With the evolving designs, engines, and shapes of trailer campers, the trailer lights also change. Today, we have LEDs in place of the globes and much more complicated devices, yet the trailer lights i.e. the running/brake lights and indicators are in the same arrangement; wiring running through the light fittings and a plug connecting to the tow vehicle.

There could be many reasons the trailer lights can go awry but most of the time it can be fixed by anyone who has little skills.

Camper Trailer Lights

Tools required

A digital or an analogue multimeter, you could also get a 12V globe test probe.
400-grade silicon carbide
Wet & dry paper
And needless to say screwdrivers and pliers.

Check the plug and socket

A very basic and a preliminary check-up when the trailer lights are out is, checking the plug and the socket. The trailer plugs are quite vulnerable to abrupt movements caused by rough terrains. Functioning trailer lights depend on earth return to the negative of the battery and if this gets disturbed the trailer lights might just don’t work or become inconsistent.

Check the globe

Most of the times the trailer lights stop working is because either the internal element is broken or the globe has gone black. In case that is not the problem, check the globe with a multimeter. To gauge the globe by a multimeter, either look for a near shot circuit (good globe) or a very high resistance – an open circuit (gone globe). Another way to check it is by plugging the globe into a light fitting which doesn’t work or hooking it up with a 12V battery and put a 12V supply to it.

Light Fittings

If the globe is intact, the next step is to check the light fittings. Many times water gets inside the light fittings which cause the light fittings to go awry. With the wet and dry paper clean the insides of the fitting.

Check Voltage

The next thing you need to check is the voltage. Check it with a multimeter by setting it on 12V DC or higher. Check across the contacts as well as each one to earth/trailer chassis. It might show a defective negative/earth cable rather than the positive supply. If that shows a problem than the wiring issues is the trailer plug and socket. In case it is not, you might have to seek professional help.

Contact Xtend Outdoors.
*

Leave a Reply