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Outback Camping: How to Avoid a Snake Bite

June 26th, 2019 in General by

Australia is home to some of the most venomous snakes in the world, eleven deadliest species are found here. And if you are an outback camper, you might get a chance to face one of them. Well, a face-off is better any day than a quick ophidian bite.

Snake Bite

Bushwalking on a treacherous outback could be an unwelcoming invite for the reptiles. However, there are ways you could have an absolutely safe outback camping and here are some ways you could avoid getting bitten by a snake.

Know about them

The best way to avoid such an encounter is having information beforehand. Do your research about the wildlife of the area you are planning to camp. It helps in getting familiar about the reptile wildlife, their appearance, habitats and venomosity.

Mind your hands

Be careful while you walk through the low-hanging branches beware of what you hold on to. Snakes often slip in on the branches and you might not even recognize a branch or a twig and try to grab a venomous a Joe Blake.

Pitch at a clean spot

An important aspect of camping is pitching your tent at a clean spot, especially while you are outback camping. There could be a dearth of clear grounds for obvious reasons. Avoid areas with tall grass and rocks, they are the perfect haven for these serpentine reptiles.

Protective clothing

There have been researches which show that 90% of snake bites are to the ankle. Despite the heat, wear long covering clothes such as trousers, thick hiking socks and boots.

Avoid swimming in swelled up water bodies

A downpour swells up the water bodies and may cause an influx of undesirable fauna. Snakes can swim and if you are in the water, things might become difficult for you. Avoid swimming in water bodies after a recent downpour.

Mind your feet

Although you are wearing protecting clothing and boots, watch your steps as you walk. Avoid stepping over dried branches and logs, they are a great nesting and resting places for these deadly creatures.

Walk away rather a standoff

On an outback adventure, an ophidian faceoff is possible but it is recommended not to make it a standoff. In most of the Australian states, snakes are protected by law and so, there is no point killing them and makes sense to step away.

Do not speak their language- A well-known fact about snakes is, they can’t hear. But these deadly crawling creatures are naturally equipped with amazing sensors and can sense vibrations, and they take vibrations as a hostile action. Do not run, or stomp or do anything such thing which can offend them.

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